20 best freelance websites to find work in 2022

Streamline your search for freelance work by setting up profiles on the top freelance websites.

Working smarter means using freelance design job boards to your advantage. There are so many job boards designed for freelancers that finding new opportunities is just a few clicks away.

22 best freelance websites to find jobs

Here are 22 freelance websites to make your hustle less of a grind:

1. Upwork

upwork's home page

Upwork may be one of the best freelance websites for finding work no matter what type of freelancer you are. Those in web development, graphic design, customer support, and even freelance writing will find that Upwork has much to offer. The seemingly unending feed of job postings is continually updated. From small businesses to huge corporations, many different types of companies are looking to hire freelancers in different disciplines including freelance designers and freelance writers.

Upwork, formerly Elance-oDesk, has a bit of a learning curve when you first get up and running. You’ll have to learn the artistry of writing effective proposals, and you may have to bid below your pay rate to build up your feedback rating. Many freelance jobs are posted on Upwork, but there’s a hungry audience competing for them. Unless you’re an Upwork superstar, bidding on a project that already has 30 proposals usually isn’t worth it.

That being said, some freelance designers secure plenty of work on Upwork and score project after project. Upwork can be worth the time — it offers the potential for great returns once you’ve established yourself on the freelance platform.

2. Designhill

designhill home page

Designhill gives employers looking for freelance designers a few ways to find them. Employers can create a project contest to find creative freelancers and receive a variety of design entries to choose from. Or, they can find freelancers by seeking out specific services through a search box right at the top of the landing page. 

Design contests are pretty polarizing. If you’re someone who grumbles at crowdsourcing work on freelancing sites, we feel your pain. But not all design contests are a scam, and Designhill shows that they can be a legitimate enterprise if you’re looking to win over new clients. 

Designhill has a lot to offer whether you’re a graphic designer, web designer, or pursuing other types of design. Designhill further courts their creatives by offering them the chance to design their own T-shirts, have them printed, and sell them in their online shop. This is a nice touch, giving freelance designers yet another way to get their work out there and to make some money off their artistry via a freelancing platform.

diagram of how designhill works

3. Toptal

toptal home page

Toptal pitches themselves as a place to find the top 3% of freelance talent. Their screening process is so rigorous that out of the thousands of submissions they get every month, they only accept a few into their ranks. This exclusivity sets them apart from so many other freelance job sites out there. It may seem intimidating getting in, but if you do, you’ll get the chance to put yourself in front of some pretty big names — Airbnb, Duolingo, and Shopify are companies that have used Toptal to share job opportunities for designers, software developers, and finance experts, product managers.

4. LinkedIn and LinkedIn ProFinder

linkedin profinder

Whatever your field, especially if you’re a creative, you should have a LinkedIn profile. Keeping your profile up to date helps you build your network and connect with people via the integrated messaging system. 

You can post examples of your work for each role you’ve had, making it more than just a resume. And by having your skills searchable on this platform, you’re bound to bring in some traffic to your profile and connect with people who may be looking for your exact design expertise. 

Another smart feature that LinkedIn has rolled out is LinkedIn ProFinder, which helps businesses find freelancers who are qualified to work for them. Potential employers can filter by different specialties like content marketing, design, data entry, and more. LinkedIn ProFinder also sends project leads your way via email, giving you the chance to write a proposal and bid. It’s like having a recruiter who is always looking out for you.

And thanks to LinkedIn job postings, this is one of the most reliable sites for online jobs, whether you’re looking for remote jobs, part-time gigs, or full-time freelance work. There’s a reason why LinkedIn is one of the best job sites: they continue to deliver what job seekers are looking for.

5. We Work Remotely

we work remotely

We Work Remotely boasts that they get around 3 million users a month. That’s huge. They have a multitude of job postings in categories like programming, design, sales, marketing, customer support, and more. We Work Remotely is one of the most well-known sites for online jobs, including both freelance and fulltime gigs.

People or companies seeking to hire freelancers have to spend a fixed price of $299 to list on We Work Remotely, which acts as a screening process and weeds out a lot of low-quality job leads. With heavy hitters such as Google, Amazon, and InVision all listed as companies who’ve posted on it, this is a legit platform. And what’s even better, you don’t have to create a profile — all you need to do is click on a job link and be brought straight there.

If you’re looking for online freelance jobs, We Work Remotely is a solid resource for part-time and full-time freelance job opportunities that will fit your skill set.

6. Behance

best of behance

Behance is one of the best sites for freelancers in creative fields. It features so much great work to soak in, including illustrations, animations, web design, mobile app development, and more.

When you fill in your Behance profile with great project samples, your work is put in front of an audience of like-minded creatives. And if your work earns the coveted spot of featured project, you’ll get even more positive exposure. Who knows who might see it and might want to hire you. Behance also functions as a social media network to connect with other designers. Expanding your list of contacts may bring you new design opportunities.

Behance also offers a jobs section, which has quite a few leads for quality freelance work. You won’t find an endless scroll of jobs, but what’s posted falls in line with Behance’s fantastic reputation.


7. SimplyHired

If you’re still figuring out how to get work as a freelancer, SimplyHired  has a lot of great resources that go beyond a simple freelance job board. You’ll find guides on resume writing, cover letter writing, and other information to help you out. SimplyHired even has a free online resume builder if you need to revamp yours. 

This site doesn’t charge employers for job postings, which opens a floodgate of job opportunities. And for freelance workers wanting to be seen by potential clients, SimplyHired makes it super easy to upload a resume and get your profile up and running. 

Their job search functions also come in handy, letting you narrow down your searches only to what you’re interested in. Having a focused search is much more valuable than sites that display only loosely related results.

8. Dribbble

discover top designers on behance

Dribbble is one of the most popular freelance websites for designers of all specialties. So if you’re looking for freelance design jobs ranging from graphic design to product design and everything in between — you need to set up a profile on Dribbble. 

Having a high-quality Dribbble profile is a great way to market yourself and to show potential clients what you’re capable of. Dribbble gets a lot of traffic, with plenty of clients looking for talented designers. All you need to do is write a stellar bio and show off the best of your portfolio.

Dribbble also gives you an easy way to update your work availability and lets you flip the switch on and off whenever you need to. And if you upgrade to the pro level, you get access to an exclusive freelance design job board.

Web developers, graphic designers, and others with related skill sets won’t only find inspiration on Dribbble but may also find their next freelance gig.

9. Fiverr

fiverr home page

Fiverr got its name because it originally facilitated quick freelance gigs for five dollars — but it’s grown quite a bit since then. Now, you can set your own starting prices, packages, and add ons. Many savvy freelancers use lower sticker prices for small projects to lure in new clients. Kind of like giving them a cheap sample so they’ll want to contract you for larger projects. 

It’s worth noting that Fiverr also builds payments right into the platform, so you don’t have to worry about invoicing your clients or sending them Paypal reminders. Once you complete the buyer’s order, the money is transferred to your account. So while some freelancers dismiss Fiverr because of its humble beginnings, it’s a great freelance website for beginners as well as anyone willing to offer a range of rates for different work.

10. PeoplePerHour

people per hour home page

PeoplePerHour markets themselves as doing a better job of pairing clients with professionals compared to other websites for freelancers. With the help of artificial intelligence, PeoplePerHour aims to bring freelancers and clients together in a more streamlined, precise way. 

Once clients submit the project scope, the artificial intelligence system analyzes the details and matches the project with qualified freelancers. Those freelancers are invited to submit their proposals — setting their own prices — and clients choose from a curated selection. 

PeoplePerHour remains one of the best freelancer websites because clients and freelancers alike can avoid wasting their time searching for the right fit. Plus, PeoplePerHour builds payments into the system to protect both parties from messy payment disagreements.

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11. Guru

find freelancers on guru

Guru has an authentic, grassroots feel to what they do. They encourage transparency on their freelance platform and value trust, making sure that whatever your role, expectations are met. These sensibilities also extend to their job postings, which all clearly communicate what a project entails. 

Guru has a built-in vetting process for freelancers, which helps freelancers prove their credibility to potential clients and simplifies the hiring process. Invoicing for your work is simple too, with multiple payment terms and secure payments integrated into the site. 

There’s nothing sketchy here, making Guru a reputable source to go to if you’re looking for new freelance design work or freelance in a wide range of industries.

how guru works

12. Freelancer

find freelance work on freelancer.com

Freelancer covers many different facets of freelance work — everything from design work like graphic and logo design to marketing work such as SEO and copywriting jobs.The wide variety of specializations makes Freelancer one of the best freelancing sites to search for opportunities. You can even find freelance gigs in multiple languages including Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, and more. 

Job seekers can filter jobs by several categories including fixed price projects, hourly rate projects, contests, skills, and languages. And every job listing shows an average bid along with the current number of bidders, so you know what to expect before applying. So if you’re looking for flex jobs, remote work, and other freelance gigs — Freelancer is a great option.

13. AngelList Talent

angellist for remote work

Working with startups can be exciting. You may get the chance to shape a brand’s identity and flex your creativity a bit more than with established companies. AngelList Talent connects freelancers with these up-and-coming businesses.

AngelList not only makes it easy to find cool startups, but also streamlines the application process for you — one application for thousands of jobs. Who knows which startup will rise up and become the next huge company? You may just get to be a part of the next big thing.

100,000 startups use angellist

14. DesignCrowd

designcrowd for freelancers

DesignCrowd is a design job board that covers several design disciplines — connecting freelance designers with clients all around the world. It’s a comprehensive freelance marketplace that caters to clients who love options. 

Clients can court multiple designers, allowing them to find just the right fit. Like many freelance sites, they offer crowdsourcing to do their work. If that’s your thing, you should definitely check out DesignCrowd. Just keep in mind that you’ll be competing with other freelancers on every project without earning an hourly rate for your work.

15. 99designs

99designs for freelancers

99designs is another great website for freelancers that allows designers to connect with businesses around the world. If you’re a designer looking for freelance work online, 99Designs is a great place to start. You can choose the design styles and industries that interest you

However, 99designs does come with some startup costs for freelance workers. 99Designs charges a $100 introduction fee to match you with clients as well as platform and payment fees. 

16. Working Not Working

freelance jobs on working not working

If you’ve ever checked out the Working Not Working magazine, you know that they’re serious about design and empowering those with the tools to help people grow in their careers. This branch of their company works so well in complementing this mission.

Their landing page features profiles of some of the creatives who inhabit this space. Read through these bios and you’ll see that the creative professionals who come here are serious about their craft, with impressive credentials and skill sets. You’re among good company if you sign up for your own account.

Along with giving designers visibility, Working Not Working has a solid job board with a ton of great jobs.

17. Webflow Experts

If you’re a Webflow all-star looking for web design freelancing jobs, Webflow Experts is a great way to find highly motivated clients. Companies turn to Webflow Experts for a variety of services such as platform migrations, custom code, rebrands and redesigns, no code app creation, ecommerce, and more. 

And because you have to be accepted into the Webflow Experts program, clients feel confident hiring freelance designers and developers from this pool.

18. YunoJuno

YunoJuno UK-based freelancing website

YunoJuno is a UK based freelance marketplace for creative individuals. They were created on the mission to champion “the future of work” for innovative companies and freelance creatives.

If invoicing and chasing down payments is your least favorite part of freelancing, YunoJuno could be a useful freelance platform for you. You send your invoice directly to YunoJuno and they pay you within 14 days — protecting you from messy back and forth with clients. 

From designers to marketers, YunoJuno is a great freelance website to start with if you’re based in the UK.

19. Authentic Jobs

authentic jobs freelancer and job website

Authentic Jobs is a leading job board for software developers, creatives, and designers. The great thing about this freelance site is that you can look specifically for freelance gigs, internships, part-time, and full-time work. From digital marketing jobs, UI/UX jobs, and software development jobs, you’ll find it all on Authentic Jobs.

20. TaskRabbit

taskrabbit freelance labor website homepage

While many websites for freelancers focus on remote work, TaskRabbit specializes in local freelance jobs — though they have expanded to include virtual services as well. This freelance marketplace connects freelance workers (Taskers) with people in the same area who need help with odd jobs. 

Freelance gigs on TaskRabbit cover day-to-day errands and tasks like furniture assembly, yard work, lightning installation, moving help, etc. TaskRabbit is perfect for anyone who wants to take on occasional freelance gigs in their area.